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Grumman Hellcat F6F

Aircraft specs (P-40B):

Wingspan 37 feet 4 inches
Length 33 feet 4 inches
Height 12 feet 4 inches
Empty Weight 5,812 pounds
Max. Weight 7,549 pounds
Powerplant 1 Allison V-1710-33 1040 hp
Armament 4x Wings Mounted .30 Cal Machine Guns
2 x .50 cal fuselage mounted machine guns.
Crew 1
Max Speed 345 mph
Service Ceiling 15,000 feet
Range 800 miles with no drop tanks

Aircraft specs (P-40N):

Engine: 1360hp Allison V-1710-81 inline piston engine
Weight: Empty 6,000 lbs.
Max Takeoff 11,400 lbs
Wing Span: 37ft. 4in.
Length: 33ft. 4in.
Height: 12ft. 4in.
Maximum Speed at 10,000ft: 378mph
Ceiling: 38,000ft
Range: 840 miles (with no external tanks)
Armament: Six 12.7mm (0.5-inch) wing-mounted machine guns Up to 1,500lbs of bombs on three wing hard-points

Aircraft specs (P-40C):

Manufacturer: Curtiss
Type: Warhawk P-40C
Year Built: 194?
Engine: Allison V-1710-33



Curtiss P-40

The Curtiss P-40 was an American single-engine, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. It was used by the air forces of 28 nations, including those of most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in front line service until the end of the war. By November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation’s main production facility at Buffalo, New York.

The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36; this reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service.

Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the United States for all P-40s.

The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the P-40B and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.

The P-40 was the United States’ best fighter plane available in large numbers when World War II began. P-40s engaged Japanese aircraft at Pearl Harbor and in the Philippines in December 1941. They also served with the famed Flying Tigers in China in 1942.

The aircraft was a descendent of the “Hawk” line produced by the Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Corporation in the 1930s and 1940s. It shared certain design elements with its predecessors, the Hawk and Sparrowhawk.

Though often slower and less maneuverable than its adversaries, the P-40 earned a reputation in battle for extreme ruggedness. The airplane served throughout the war but was eclipsed by more capable aircraft.

Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps adopted for all models, making it the official name in the United States for all P-40s.

The British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces used the name Tomahawk for models equivalent to the P-40B and P-40C, and the name Kittyhawk for models equivalent to the P-40D and all later variants.

More than 13,738 P-40 planes were built during 1939-1944 at the Curtiss plant in Buffalo, NY. The P-40 served in the air forces of 28 nations, and was the third-most numerous US fighter plane produced for World War II.